More photos from Santa Fe

Taking photos in Santa Fe is like cheating.  You just point the camera out the back door and voila!

{Image: two bare trees, very slender with white bark against a very deep blue sky.}

Disc Golf Henge:

{Image:  snowy field with four small (approximately one-foot-tall) rock formations each in the shape of an inverted "U"}

Fence.

{Image:  fence made of vertical pieces of natural wood of varying heights.  In the bottom half of the photo, the wood slats are backed by a solid piece of wood.  In the top half of the photo, there is nothing behind the vertical slats, and the sun peeks through between two of the slats.}

Fence, HDR.

{Image: fence made of vertical pieces of natural wood of varying heights. In the bottom half of the photo, the wood slats are backed by a solid piece of wood. In the top half of the photo, there is nothing behind the vertical slats, and the sun peeks through between two of the slats.}

Barbed wire, HDR:

{Image:  close up of a photo of a single barb in a strand of barbed wire.  In the background, and out of focus, is the side of an adobe building.}

I couple of friends we met on our walk.

{Image:  A goat peers around the corner of a wood and wire fence.  To his left are three chickens, two black and one white.}

Window.  Almost anything looks good in adobe.  Ask Santa Fe!  I think it’s in the building code!

{Image:  a window in an adobe wall.  The window reflects a very blue sky.  Tree branches enter the photo from the right.}

Water spout:

{Image:  a flat water spout protrudes from an adobe wall with several feet of frozen water suspended off the end.}

The same water spout, an hour later:

{Image:  a flat water spout protrudes from an adobe wall with several feet of frozen water suspended off the end.  The adobe is much darker than the previous photo because of the setting sun.}}

Hubble the Golden Retriever discovers that Rodney has a snack.

{Image:  in the left side of the photo, a man sits at a table working at a laptop computer.   To his right, a golden retriever stares intently at him.  The corner of another laptop shows in the foreground; kitchen appliances are in the background.  The table  has a candle, a water bottle, a card and envelope, a french press with tea and a mug,}

And it wouldn’t be my blog unless I took the opportunity to go just a bit Andy Rooney on your ass.   My rental car was a Prius.  Even after I learned the sequence of button pushing and gear shifting that was necessary to make it go, and adjusted to the fact that it sounded, at every light, like the car had died and I’d need to call a tow truck, there were two more very disconcerting things.

(1)  You don’t need a key to drive the car but you do need a key to unlock it.  This means that when you get in the car, you have to figure out what to do with the key, since it’s not sitting in the ignition.  If I owned a Prius, I would lock the keys in the car at least once per week.

(2) You not only get the general warm, fuzzy, superior feeling of driving a really fuel-efficient car, you get a constant, real-time, animated demonstration of just HOW efficient you’re being:

{Image:  photo of a diagram of a car showing three unnamed parts with arrows going from one to another.  The diagram is labeled "Energy Monitor."  The display also contains the time (3:16 PM) and  the odometer (2837.4 MI).}

This little animated diagram changes as you drive, showing — near as I can tell — which direction the little energy hamsters that power the car are traveling.   The diagram is (a) designed for the driver to monitor the car’s energy situation in real time, and thus incredibly distracting and unsafe; (b) not designed to convey anything to the driver, and thus pretty pointless; or (c) designed solely to show the passenger what a cool, energy-efficient person the driver is.

6 thoughts on “More photos from Santa Fe

  1. BlueLoom

    “If I owned a Prius, I would lock the keys in the car at least once per week.”

    Fortunately, the designers of the Prius have taken this in account. If one of your key fobs is inside the car, you can’t lock the car, even if you have the other key fob in your purse and are walking away from the car with it.

    Most important lesson I’ve learned since owning a Prius (a little over a year at this point): it’s MY job to watch out for cyclists and pedestrians. Especially if the car is in electric mode (e.g., going downhill), cyclists and pedestrians can’t hear me.

    I have one especially scary place–an alley that I have to exit when I park at the gallery where I work/show my handwoven stuff. The alley is narrow. There are buildings built right to the edge of the alley on both sides. The buildings are also built right up to the sidewalk at the front (i.e., no setback at all). As I pull up to the end of the alley to exit to the street, I’m going very slowly, so my Prius is in electric mode, meaning pretty much totally silent. Because of the way the buildings are built in relation to both the sidewalk and the alley, the result of this terrible combination of factors is that I can’t see the sidewalk pedestrians and they can’t hear me. I have taken to tooting the horn briefly (apologies for the noise pollution) as I pull up to the end of the alley.

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      1. BlueLoom

        That’s probably true. It’s imprinted in your DNA. Remember the (all too true) story about your dad and I having locked the keys in the car on an overlook (read: really, really remote) on the Blue Ridge Parkway. As we agonized over what to do next, I saw a couple walking to an identical Chevy sedan–even the same color. I said to the couple (while Peter was mumbling “dummkopf” about what I was doing), “We’ve locked our keys in the car. Could we try your keys to see if they fit?” They agreed to give it a try. Their keys fit perfectly, and we didn’t have to get a locksmith out to the back of beyond (in the days long before cell phones).

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  2. Amy Adams

    I absolutely ADORE these photos–like to the point that I want to get copies of the tees against the sky and the second water spout and hang them. Seriously, you should put them on a wall yourself.

    (Seriously–would you sell these to me?)

    I have an older Prius with a somewhat less distracting display, which I hardly ever have up, probably because I feel shamed by it when I’m using gas rather than battery. Which probably reveals more about me….

    And yet–my Prius refuses to display the radio song title and band message on a single screen, preferring instead to put up a (longer) message that it is too distracting to display that information while the car is in motion. I am allowed to see it when the car is stopped. Or when my iPod is plugged in. But for radio, I am allowed to watch the information as it scrolls in chunks across the top of the radio screen–because that is safer?

    I still love my Prius, though. Perhaps because I love feeling smug about what a cool, energy-efficient driver I am. Mostly, though, because when it’s 10 below zero, I really appreciate how fast a 9 gallon tank fills up at the pump! I’m back inside a warm car while the SUV drivers are still shivering outside.

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    1. Amy Robertson Post author

      *blush* Thank you so much — your kind words mean a lot from someone whose own photos are so beautiful! And at least the Prius makes an attempt to show you the song title & band. My new CRV doesn’t even try, which I rationalize as acceptable on the grounds that my musical tastes are so out of date that I wouldn’t recognize any of the titles or bands anyway.

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  3. Richasaurus

    I have driven a borrowed Prius, and the MPH display was like a little video game for me to play with as I drive. When I drove conservatively, the bar raised, when I punched it, the bar dropped precipitously. I played the “maximize your efficiency” game as I drove back and forth to pick up my little kid, or to go find the next frisbee golf course. One plus is that I drive within the speed limit much more frequently- once you are at speed, it is easy to maintain your rate without a lot of input. One minus is that I refer to this display frequently while driving, and I hope that it does not distract me from the road. Very strange little cars.

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